RE:BIND

Browsing category: Indienoculars

do deer have this many…. sets of eyes, normally??

It’s late, you’re at your creaky cabin on a cold night, but what strikes a chill down your spine isn’t the weather, but the sudden realization that you’ve dropped your keys somewhere.

Woodsy is a game about relying on neighbors to help you get home, except your neighbors are often on the decomposing, ethereal side of things.

Read the rest of this article »

Where are my heavy metal MIDIs?

Okaeri Studios is a little microindie creating a lovely rogue-like called DOOMGeon, it’s a fun and visually engaging jaunt through some bitter overlord’s maze full of skeletons cured in jelly and extremely angry treasure chests. Lovingly inspired by the shooters and ARPGs of yore, Okaeri Studios is setting out on a kickstarter campaign to raise funds to hire a few artists to help polish up the concept over the course of development.

Read the rest of this article »

GOOD AFTERNOON, FRIENDS

Nobody likes Mondays, so posits orange cat theory. I however am personally very fond of Wednesdays, the perfect mid-week point to take a brief moment of respite and engage in some healthy distractions. Without further ado, here’s some lovely distractions looking at while we cook up more delightful interviews:

The Golden Tulip by Daniel Draper & Nicholas McDonnell

Read the rest of this article »

Growing up my family didn’t have a lot of spare money to throw at the newest releases, so a pass-time favorite of myself and my father was rummaging through a diverse range of demo discs picked up on various expeditions into town. These discs often contained standalone shareware experiences, or delightful samplers from an entire publisher’s catalog.

One of these offerings I found myself enamored with was one of Microsoft’s Motocross Madness titles, a dirt bike rally game that offered (for the time) satisfying and compelling physics. It was two pieces of forbidden fruit in one- the hardware intensive simulation qualities of a racing game, and the mystique of dangerous rally motorbikes. My family was incredibly dubious of the concept of motorcycles, fearing the many urban myths and folklore surrounding them as inevitable bringers of death, but to me they were a fascinating invitation to dance with joy and mortality.

Read the rest of this article »

Not for the faint of heart.

(CONTENT WARNING: Graphic depictions of suicide, discussion of suicide, strong themes of self-loathing and depression.)

Down was a hard game to play despite its easy, enticing presentation. There’s no jump scares, no monsters to fight or even any puzzles to contend with. But there is a visceral reflection on one’s baggage and traumatic history, something that Warden admits is inspired by her own struggles with anxiety.

There are themes and locales that will likely read similar to environments in Silent Hill 2, namely the narrow graveyard with foggy autumn weather. Warden successfully executes on the oppressively isolating macabre atmosphere which serves as a backdrop for the narrative’s exploration of self-harm.

Read the rest of this article »

(CW: Implied Cannibalism, Themes of Animal Cruelty)

It is astoundingly rare that I find a gameplay loop this compelling in any title, commercial or otherwise, yet Dan Mullins has managed to deliver something so mouth-wateringly enticing that it’s impossible to resist.

Known for Pony Island, Mullins is an experimental game designer that produces juicy Ludum Dare entries that push the boundaries of presentation and remind us what Game Jams should strive to accomplish.

Read the rest of this article »

For some of us, Chaos will always be our element.

A Knight’s Fee by Anders G. Jensen is one of the more compelling entries I’ve seen emerge from the Global Game Jam. What’s fascinating is that a talented character artist has chosen to make not one, but two games where they intentionally obfuscate the vision of the character as both a mechanic and a service to the atmosphere.

Compared to Blind Samurai, A Knight’s Fee is arguably the more playable of these two titles. Blind Samurai helps to establish the initial concept of having to rely on audio cues in the face of reduced stimuli which cause the game to feel quite spartan. This approach, however, pays off in how A Knight’s Fee manages to immediately establish a thick visual ambiance with adrenaline bleeding into the scenery in every direction.

Read the rest of this article »

An average London night, wandering around after a bender at the pub only to be confronted by an angry football hooligan.

Simulations and immersion are like peanut butter and chocolate, or hazelnuts and ganache if you prefer. They’re lovely things when separate and go shockingly well together in a classic genre born out of experimental titles in the 90s.

Dillon Rogers is no stranger to the genre and decided, after working with New Blood on DUSK, to embark on his own homage to the Looking Glass greats.

We sat down for a chat about his London-fog flavored stealth shooter Gloomwood:

Read the rest of this article »

A rough night, one of many.

Bird Of Passage arrives from the same metaphysical pedigree as Glitchhikers or Kentucky Route Zero both in aesthetics and execution. All three games follow a minimalist approach with dialogue driven by the momentum of inference, built around the whimsical framework of Magical Realism. Sidewalks covered by slick sheen, a lonely street light, blurry out of focus reflections that accentuate pastel taxis coming together to illustrate a long journey into an endless night wandering the Tokyo suburbs. Space Backyard has given a superb performance in capturing the plight of a listless wanderer.

Read the rest of this article »

Part interactive fiction, part audio drama, part exploratory game. In the Pause between the Ringing is a fascinating journey into the ontological impact of colonial occupation and resource exploitation through the lens of magical realism. Not only exploring what it means to be seized by hostile corporate overlords, but the ensuing effect upon a language, a culture, and the places that form in its wake.

Commissioned by the Victoria And Albert Museum’s Design/Play/Disrupt program, Pause is a bleak reminder of the not-too-distant past, when the English and Dutch crowns extended their tendrils across every continent and encircled the world. At the core of these imperialistic ambitions was economic innovation and exploitation of natural resources without any regard for the local populace.

Read the rest of this article »